Crown and Bridges

 

A crown is the top part of your tooth that you can see above the gum line. If your tooth is damaged or weakened you may require an artificial crown made to cover the existing tooth. Other reasons for having a crown are to improve appearance or to prevent damage to other surrounding teeth.

A bridge is a prosthetic device that replaces two or more teeth. To construct the crown or bridge an impression of both your upper and lower teeth are taken to make sure that the new crown or bridge is a perfect reproduction of your natural “bite”. This is then sent away to a lab technician who specialises in building crowns.

Your tooth is prepared to take the crown by reshaping your natural tooth. The dentist will numb your mouth so you will not feel any discomfort during the treatment. Impressions are taken again so the technician can make the crown to fit perfectly over the newly shaped tooth.

A temporary crown is then fitted to your tooth and cemented with a temporary cement. During this time while waiting for your permanent crown you should avoid eating hard or chewy foods and even try chewing on the other side of your mouth.

The temporary crown is removed after a couple of weeks and replaced with the permanent artificial crown or bridge. Side effects of crowns or bridges are damage to the pulp of the tooth during the preparation for the crown.

The gum may become painful soon after the crown has been fitted, although this should resolve in a few days.

Sensation changes, and in some cases loosening of the crown after strong impact. In this case the crown or bridged can be recemented.